Answering Legal Reference Questions on a Shoestring

ARSL-for-web-600pxThe Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) is one of my favorite library organizations. I have had the privilege of presenting at the national conference and working with their leaders over the years. Join us for Answering Legal Reference Questions on a Shoestring, a webinar with Paul Healey, Senior Instructional Services Librarian at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

When: Wednesday, October 2, 2013 (75 minutes)

Start times by time zone: 11:30 am (Pacific), 12:30 pm (Mountain), 1:30 pm (Central), 2:30 pm (Eastern)

Cost: $10.00

Sponsored by the Association for Rural & Small Libraries (ARSL) and produced by Siera: Learn. Teach. Inspire.

Click here to register and pay.

If you have problems with the link above, please cut and paste it into your browser: https://www.amrms.com/ssl/arsl/membership/Conference/Events.aspx?ConfId=8dc31254-6d49-4156-8da0-9a16a83c305f

  1. Click on the radio button that says Webinar Registration.
  2. Click on the button that says Next on the righthand side of the browser window. (Sometimes it likes to hide, so make sure your browser window is opened wide.) This will take you to the registration page.
  3. Click on Webinar – Answering Legal Reference Questions on a Shoestring, and then click on Next.

After you pay, you will be directed to go to the GoToWebinar link, where you will register for the webinar itself. You will not need a microphone to participate, but speakers or headphones will improve the sound quality.

 

Photo Credit: State Library of Queensland 1948. No known copyright restrictions. http://www.flickr.com/photos/statelibraryqueensland/8808717962Webinar Description

Do your library’s customers want help with legal issues?

Reference questions seeking legal information are fairly common, but most libraries do not have the materials, or the expertise, to answer such questions. This webinar will explain the ins and outs of answering such questions, including potential legal issues when providing help. We also will look briefly at the array of legal materials and resources available for free on the Internet.

Although this webinar focuses on the needs of smaller and rural libraries, the information will prove useful to any type or size institution.

Presenter Bio

Photo of Paul Healey (ARSL presenter)Paul Healey serves as Senior Instructional Services Librarian at the Jenner Law library of the University of Illinois College of Law. He teaches Legal Research and Advanced Legal Research courses in the law school, and also teaches courses on legal materials, information ethics, and library administration at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science. He holds a JD in law and MA in library and information science from the University of Iowa, and a PhD in library and information science from the University of Illinois.

Paul is considered a national expert on librarian professional liability and on legal issues pertaining to pro se library users. More information about Paul here.

Contact info

For more information about ARSL, contact Becky Heil at becky.heil@lib.state.ia.us. For help with GoToWebinar contact Pat Wagner at pat@patternresearch.com.

 

Free Recording of Introduction to Lean Government Webinar #PM130

Click here to view a free one-hour introduction to the Lean Government webinar series with Steve Elliott and Pat Wagner:

http://tinyurl.com/SieraPM130

Who it’s for: Managers, supervisors, and employees interested in change in government agencies as well as businesses and nonprofits.

What you’ll take away: How to reduce waste, save money and time, and improve customer satisfaction.

Steve head shot square 400 x 400About your presenter: Steve Elliott, president of Constant Improvement Consulting, Inc. based in Longmont, CO, has decades of experience in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors as a manager, business owner, trainer, and consultant. He was instrumental in the creation and adoption of Colorado House Bill 11-1212, which officially made Colorado a Lean Government.

Webinar description:

This webinar and the webinar series is a joint project of Constant Improvement Consulting, Inc., and Siera: Learn. Teach. Inspire.™ Registration for the rest of the series will open August 5th. Let us know if you would like to be notified: Pat Wagner at pat@patternresearch.com

Most people (we know who we are) who work in smaller organizations – local government agencies, community nonprofits, and small businesses – watch the bottom line and provide great customer service.

However, we develop blind spots. Procedures, once efficient, are slowly choked with red tape. Processes, which worked fine when we had more staff to serve fewer people, fail under the pressure of expanding demands and shrinking resources. Our workplace cultures become reactive, A.K.A. “whack-a-mole,” and responsive customer service is replaced by a culture of expediency.

The Lean Government movement is based on a practical set of principles, organized around eliminating waste, saving money, improving the quality of products and services, and making customers happy. Steve Elliott, president of Constant Improvement Consulting, Inc., will guide you through those principles in a 10-part webinar series over the next few months.

The introductory webinar is available for free and will show you how you can immediately use these ideas in your workplace. Although the focus is local government, the principles apply to any type or size workplace. Also, leaders, managers, supervisors, and frontline (and back room) staff can master them. The goals? Reduce costs, improve productivity, and please your customers with better response time and a client-centered approach to delivering goods and services.

Contact pat@patternresearch.com for prices and payment options related to the paid programs below:

  • Tuesday, July 9, 2013: Free Introduction to Lean Government (PM 130)
  • Tuesday, Sept 10, 2013: Define Customer Value (PM 131)
  • Tuesday, Oct 8, 2013: Muda Eyes: Learn to See Waste (PM 132)
  • Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013: Lean Leadership: The Long Game (PM 133)
  • Tuesday, Dec 3, 2013: Cultivate Change Agents in Your Organization (PM 134)
  • Tuesday, Jan 7, 2014: Embrace Resistance: Turn Cynics into Supporters (PM 135)
  • Tuesday, February 4, 2014: The Lean Toolbox (PM 136)
  • Tuesday, March 4, 2014: Value Stream Mapping: Weed Out the Waste (PM 137)
  • Tuesday, April 1, 2014: Overnight Success in One Week: The Team Approach (PM 138)
  • Tuesday, April 29, 2014: The Totally Lean Organization (PM 139)

Supervisory Skills for New (and Old) Managers and Leaders

Thursday, July 18th, 2013 –  noon – 1 p.m. US/Eastern Time

Please note that this session is part of Metropolitan New York Library Council’s Library Leadership Lunch Hour webinar series with instructor Pat Wagner. To register for this series* (see below), please visit http://metro.org/events/334/.

Photo3295498010_39c6f32aff_zBig idea bosses are concerned with projects, budgets, strategic plans, and politics. However, most still have employees who require oversight, coaching, and evaluation of some kind, even if they are expected to operate without direct supervision. How do the basics of supervision, including aligning activities to the strategic plan, setting priorities, and coaching, apply to middle management and the administrative office?

Agenda:

  • Introduction: Why supervision is the key to success
  • The Key Idea: Elicit the best from the people you supervise
  • Clear expectations from the beginning
  • Written contracts and agreements
  • Positive reinforcement: Catch them, tell them, reward them
  • The dangers of conflict avoidance
  • The differences between micromanagement and oversight

Outcomes:

  • Improve productivity and workplace relationships
  • Grow the skills and commitment of supervisors and employees
  • Use positive reinforcement and workplace contracts to manage employees instead of nagging

*Other sessions in this series include:

  • Principled Leadership
  • Improving Information Exchange in Workplaces
  • What to Do When You Don’t Know What to Do: Conflict First Aid on Thursday, September 19th, 2013
  • After the Internet and eBooks: The Future of the Information Society on Thursday, October 17th, 2013
  • Virtual Customer Service Strategies: Solving Problems Via Email, Instant Messaging, and Social Media on Thursday, November 7th, 2013

Ladies’ 4-in-hand-club [Harriet Alexander driving] [between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915]. No known copyright restrictions.

Free Webinar Kicks Off Lean Government Webinar Series

When I first heard about the Lean Government movement and how quickly and effectively it could save money, eliminate waste, and improve customer service, I knew we needed to offer practical webinars on the topic. The fact that Steve Elliott, whose work we have admired for decades, is now a leader in Lean Government advocacy in our state, made our choice of trainers very simple. Please join Steve and me July 9th, 2013 for our free introduction to this engaging series on transforming your public sector workplace.

Photo Credit: Smithsonian Institution 1938. No known copyright restrictions. This is an adaptation of the original work. http://www.flickr.com/photos/smithsonian/2551232980/Introduction to LEAN Government PM 130 – REGISTER NOW!

https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/796985657

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013 from noon to 1:00 pm Mountain Time
[Please adjust for your local time zone.]

Who it’s for: Managers, supervisors, and employees interested in change in government agencies as well as businesses and nonprofits.

What you’ll take away: How to reduce waste, save money and time, and improve customer satisfaction.

About your presenter: Steve Elliott, president of Constant Improvement Consulting, Inc. based in Longmont, CO, has decades of experience in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors as a manager, business owner, trainer, and consultant. He was instrumental in the creation and adoption of Colorado House Bill 11-1212, which officially made Colorado a Lean Government.

Webinar description:

This webinar and the webinar series is a joint project of Constant Improvement Consulting, Inc., and Siera: Learn. Teach. Inspire.™ Registration for the rest of the series will open August 5th. Let us know if you would like to be notified: Pat Wagner at pat@patternresearch.com

Most people (we know who we are) who work in smaller organizations – local government agencies, community nonprofits, and small businesses – watch the bottom line and provide great customer service.

However, we develop blind spots. Procedures, once efficient, are slowly choked with red tape. Processes, which worked fine when we had more staff to serve fewer people, fail under the pressure of expanding demands and shrinking resources. Our workplace cultures become reactive, A.K.A. “whack-a-mole,” and responsive customer service is replaced by a culture of expediency.

The Lean Government movement is based on a practical set of principles, organized around eliminating waste, saving money, improving the quality of products and services, and making customers happy. Steve Elliott, president of Constant Improvement Consulting, Inc., will guide you through those principles in a 10-part webinar series over the next few months.

The introductory webinar is available for free and will show you how you can immediately use these ideas in your workplace. Although the focus is local government, the principles apply to any type or size workplace. Also, leaders, managers, supervisors, and frontline (and back room) staff can master them. The goals? Reduce costs, improve productivity, and please your customers with better response time and a client-centered approach to delivering goods and services.

Lean Government Webinar Series
All begin at noon, Mountain Time
[Please adjust for your local time zone.]
Registration opens August 5th, 2013.

Contact pat@patternresearch.com for prices and payment options related to the paid programs below:

  • Tuesday, July 9, 2013: Free Introduction to Lean Government
  • Tuesday, Sept 10, 2013: Define Customer Value
  • Tuesday, Oct 8, 2013: Muda Eyes: Learn To See Waste
  • Tuesday, Nov 5, 2013: The Value Stream
  • Tuesday, Dec 3, 2013: Change for the Better
  • Tuesday, Jan 7, 2014: Tools of the Trade
  • Tuesday, February 4, 2014: The Change Agent
  • Tuesday, March 4, 2014: Embracing Resistance
  • Tuesday, April 1, 2014: Lean Leadership
  • Tuesday, April 29, 2014: The Totally Lean Organization

Postmaster General James A. Farley is shown sitting with some of the hundreds of thousands of letters mailed during National Air Mail Week, May 15-21, 1938.

Photo Credit: Smithsonian Institution 1938. No known copyright descriptions. This is an adaptation of the original work. http://www.flickr.com/photos/smithsonian/2551232980/

The Future Of Higher Education Series: My College Degree, Take One

As Art Director here at Siera, I do everything from creating new presentation templates to discussing which color of yellow is right for our web palette. One of the things I like most about working for Siera and getting to know its founders, Pat Wagner and Leif Smith, is the discovery of kindred spirits, fellow travelers who question the status quo of education. In this series, I’ll address the trajectory of higher education in a personal context. If you’d like to connect with me, send a message to bronwen@patternresearch.com

From my days at Alpine Valley School. (I’m the short one in the middle.)

I’ve had my fair share of varied experiences, but with almost three years of a four-year degree under my belt, I’m still searching for the right balance in an educational model. My interest in alternative education began at twelve years old, around the time public school was driving me to pull out every hair on my head. I am blessed with a supportive family, especially my mother, who helped me find a school outside the shortsighted academic model of the mainstream. The first time I read Free At Last, by Daniel Greenberg, founder of Sudbury Valley School in Sudbury, Massachusetts, my mind opened in a way I’ll remember for the rest of my life. We were fortunate to discover that Colorado boasts its own Sudbury school. I attended Alpine Valley School for five years and graduated as the equivalent of a high school senior. Its mixed age environment, lack of grades, democratic governance and student-driven learning changed how I think about school.

Directly out of Alpine Valley, I jumped into the fray at Metropolitan State College of Denver, a large commuter campus in downtown Denver. Immersed in conventional class structures for the first time since my pre-teens, I had to relearn how to play the game. What are textbooks full of facts and tests designed for their regurgitation if not a game? Our society loves a good competition, and here, as in the professional sports we idolize, those best suited for the specific skills required rise to the top. Unfortunately, this design fatally overlooks the span of human ingenuity and fails to nurture the almost unlimited array of learning preferences.

My stint at Metro lasted about two years, and included three changes to my major, a month in France, and the worst professor I’ve ever had. Dropping out was a relief. I let go of the quest for a degree and focused on supporting myself while developing my hobbies. Since my first job as a barista at sixteen, I’ve worked to pay my own way as much as possible. This drive for independence fits well with my tendency toward alternative education. I kept alive the dream that one day I would find the perfect college, something like a Sudbury school for higher ed. I knew there were non-traditional colleges out there—Evergreen State College in Washington and Hampshire in Cambridge, to name a few—but so far, nothing had seemed right. That is, until a friend told me about his experience at Goddard College in Plainfield, Vermont. It felt like Alpine Valley all over again. I thought my whole life was about to change.

To be continued…

Next up in The Future Of Higher Education Series: Trouble In Paradise

What Libraries Need To Know To Help Local Businesses Succeed

We have worked for libraries since 1978 and for business start-ups longer. Although we applaud the work public libraries are doing to support business success, we have noticed an interesting disconnect. Most of our friends who work in libraries have never started or run a successful business. It is one thing to watch a relative or friend spend long hours from idea to new business and on to success or failure, but watching is different from doing it yourself. And it also makes a difference if you have been involved hands-on with different business models and in different fields and not just one enterprise.

What Libraries Need To Know To Help Local Businesses Succeed

Tuesday, May 14th, 2013 from 10:30 am to 11:30 am Eastern Time (USA)

Fee:  $49.00. Receive a discount of $20.00 when you use the discount code SAVE20.

Photo Credit: The Library of Congress 1939. No known copyright descriptions. This is an adaptation of the original work. http://www.flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress/2179131683Libraries help people start and grow neighborhood businesses with programs on government licensing and funding, as well as workshops on research. But how many people on your staff have ever run a successful business? How can you help the self-employed professional or artisan who won’t qualify for a bank loan? What about the unemployed dreamer who needs a reality check about what it takes to open a restaurant or make money from an invention? Who in your community can offer advice that applies to current business models? Can you offer business-support services that will create new jobs in your community?

Participants will learn how to:

– Better see, hear, and understand the challenges to small business success; it is not just about filling out forms.

– Identify and target the different kinds of businesses, business models, and business owners:

– Build a team of local business owners to provide advice on relevant programming,
funding, marketing, and personnel issues.

http://pciwebinars.com/may-14th-what-libraries-need-to-know-to-help-local-businesses-succeed/